Holy books

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Dialogo sopra i due massimi sistemi del mondo (Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems), by Galileo Galilei.

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Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy), by Isaac Newton.

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De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres), by Nicolas Copernico.

And another one from Tycho Brahe for which I unfortunately don’t have a proper picture.

We saw them all yesterday at the James Melville Gilliss Library, as part of a tour to the United States Naval Observatory (USNO)–the institution in charge of providing precise time (the “Master Clock”) to the GPS system.

If there’s such a thing as a holy book, now I know what’s to be before a few of them.

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Straight to the map

OK, this is pretty cool:

GPS and photos with the N78

Yesterday I went to watch Ironman and on my way back home I decided to take some crappy pictures every 5 minutes to test the mobile’s GPS. The map above is the result (click to get the actual one): the trail starts at the cinema in the top-right region, and finishes in my place at the bottom-left.

To get the map I didn’t have to do anything special. Just uploaded the photos to Picasa and you’re done (I couldn’t make it work with Flickr yet). You get a map with your photos georeferenced, and a automatic KML in case you prefer using the Google Earth imagery.

During the last months at the office we’ve spent a considerable amount of work georeferencing our data and putting it on maps. A problem we’ve detected is that workers in the field do not have the necessary devices (software, GPS) to enhance the data-collecting or the post-processing. I can’t wait to see this technologies reaching the field.